Thursday, August 7, 2014

Seniors Need Greater Awareness of Cataract Symptoms

Eyecare Medical Group wishes to alert seniors and others at risk for cataracts about the need for greater awareness of cataract symptoms as poor vision in seniors is often associated with premature or accelerated mental decline and reduced vision can create real challenges in terms of mobility and safety, with patients being at increased risk for orthopedic injury-especially hip fracture. So, helping seniors become more familiar with the symptoms of cataracts and restore vision with cataract surgery has an important place in securing senior health and well being.

A cataract is a clouding of the crystalline lens of the eye preventing light rays from passing through it easily. This results in a clouding and blurring of vision. Cataracts start out slowly and have little effect on vision at first but as the cataract becomes denser, so does effect on vision. The most common symptoms that bother patients with cataracts can include blurring or clouding of vision, sensitivity to light and glare, double vision in one eye, poor night vision, fading or yellowing of colors and frequent changes in glasses or contact lens prescriptions.


If and when cataracts begin to interfere with daily activities or with patient comfort, mobility and safety, they can be treated surgically. Cataract surgery is one of the safest and most frequently performed surgeries in the United States. Today, we have a full range of lens implants available that allow us to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism and even near vision problems after cataract surgery, as well as distance vision, without requiring bifocals or reading glasses for the vast majority of patients.

If you or someone you know has questions about cataract, cataract surgery or lens implants please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Critical Retina Exam Important Before Cataract Surgery

Having a thorough and critical retina exam is important before having cataract surgery. When cataract patients report a decrease in vision, it is important to correlate the visual symptoms and visual acuity to the degree of cataract present. If you have a considerable amount of vision loss but only mild cataracts, the actual cause of the vision loss must be identified. In many cases, a careful examination of the retina can reveal underlying pathology such as epiretinal membranes, retinal wrinkling or macularpucker with edema. In fact, some studies report a prevalence of epiretinal membranes in 7% of patients older than 60 years and in 20% of patients aged 75 years or more-the prime demographic for cataract surgery. Therefore, before you have cataract surgery expect to have whatever level of examination and testing your cataract surgeon requests in order to help you get the best results.

 Retina Cross View
Retina Cross View
If you or someone you know has questions about cataracts, cataract surgery and the need for a critical retina exam before surgery should feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Monday, July 21, 2014

Posterior Capsular Opacity


This is a dramatic image of a posterior capsular opacity. Frequently, after cataract surgery, a membrane can form on the posterior portion of the lens capsule. This lens capsule is necessary to hold the lens implant in place after the lens is removed. Treatment for this membrane is done with a technique called YAG Laser Capsulotomy right in the office and is painless and short in duration and restores vision almost instantly. Using tangential lighting, we were able to illustrate not only the membrane, but show the different densities and canals within the membrane.


If you or someone you know has questions about cataracts, cataract surgery and the need for a critical retina exam before surgery should feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Monday, July 14, 2014

Inflammation Markers Predict AMD Risk

The inflammation marker CRP (c-reactive proteins) is a blood test that can predict your risk of Age Related macular Degeneration (AMD) according to researchers from Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston who reported in JAMA Ophthalmology.

The research showed that there was a significantly increased risk of AMD for those patients with high versus low CRP levels and those with high CRP levels also had a significantly increased risk of neovascular or Wet AMD. The researchers concluded that elevated levels of CRP predict greater future risk of AMD. It is believed that this information might shed light on underlying mechanisms and could be of clinical help in the identification of persons at high risk of AMD who may benefit from increased adherence to lifestyle recommendations, eye examination schedules and therapeutic protocols.

If you or someone you know has questions about their Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)  risk and CRP testing to predict their risk should feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Thursday, July 3, 2014

Use Caution for Fireworks Eye Safety This July 4th


This July 4th EyecareMedical Group wishes to alert patients to use caution as they celebrate the holiday by attending and participating in fireworks displays. In general it is really best to leave fireworks use and display to professionals in order to avoid the risk of eye injury. Eye safety is pretty critical with fireworks displays as we know that eye injuries are the second most frequent injury we see from emergency room each July 4th weekend. Some caution and responsible precautions to avoid the risk of eye damage from fireworks include simply not letting kids play with any fireworks. It is best if you do not purchase, use or store fireworks of any type and attend only authorized public fireworks displays conducted by licensed operators, but be aware that even professional displays can be dangerous. However, if an eye accident does occur, there are a few things you should know:

·         Do not rub the eye.
·         Do not attempt to rinse out the eye. This can be even more damaging than rubbing.
·         Do not apply pressure to the eye itself-but protecting the eye from further contact with any item, including the person’s hand.
·         Do not stop for medicine! Over-the-counter pain relievers will not do much to relieve pain. Aspirin (should never be given to children) and ibuprofen can thin the blood, increasing bleeding. Take the person to the emergency room at once.
·         Do not apply ointments or drops. They may not be sterile and may make the area around the eye slippery and harder for the doctor to examine.

Once you are seen in the emergency room please feel free to have them call Eyecare Medical Group-888-374-2020-as we always have an eye doctor “on call” to provide consultation and continued care for you.

If you or someone you know has questions about fireworks eye safety and eye injuries please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Monday, June 9, 2014

Reduce Your Cataract Risk by Walking & Running

It is possible that you can reduce your risk of cataracts by moderate walking or more vigorous running according to a study published in Medicine and Science in Sports by researchers at the Life Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In previous studies the risk of cataracts formation was found to be lower in runners over time. In this Berkeley study when the incidence of cataracts was adjusted for sex, race, age, education, smoking, and intakes of meat, fruit and alcohol, lower cataract risk was significantly associated with both running and walking with no significant difference in risk reduction between running and walking, or between men and women. 

Further, the cataract risk appears to decrease linearly with increasing exercise energy expenditure.

If you or someone you know has questions about how to reduce the risk of cataracts by walking or running, please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Wednesday, June 4, 2014

What Causes a Bright Red Eye?

Patients sometimes call our practice complaining of a “bright red eye” or “bleeding eye”. It seems to come on with a cough or a sneeze-or sometimes with some heavy lifting-or for no reason at all-and causes no pain, blurry vision or discharge. What could it be? We will of course ask you to come in so we can evaluate the problem, but it is possible that it is a subconjunctival hemorrhage. Subconjunctival hemorrhage is a benign disorder that is a common cause of acute ocular redness or “bright red eye”. The major risk factors include trauma and contact lens usage in younger patients, whereas among the elderly, systemic vascular diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and arteriosclerosis are more common. In patients in whom subconjunctival hemorrhage is recurrent or persistent, further evaluation, including a workup for systemic hypertension, bleeding disorders, systemic and ocular malignancies and drug side effects, is warranted.

If you or someone you know experiences a “bright red eye” please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.