Maine LASIK Cataract Eye Care Surgery Blog Portland EMG

Sunday, August 2, 2015

Cataract Surgery Lowers Eye Pressure

There is a side benefit of cataract surgery for those patients who have high eye pressure or IOP or even glaucoma. Cataract surgery seems to actually lower eye pressure in these two groups of patients in proportion to how high the eye pressure was before their cataract surgery.

Dr. Sam Solish, MD
Cataract & Glaucoma Specialist
Eyecare Medical Group

Research on Cataract Surgery & Eye Pressure
Researchers reporting in Current Opinion in Ophthalmology reviewed the effect that cataract surgery had on eye pressure-or intraocular pressure (IOP). This is important, as it is believed that some 20% of patients with cataracts either have somewhat high IOP or actually have glaucoma. From their review of the data, they conclude that cataract surgery provides a lowering effect on IOP in the long term and the amount of the lowering is proportional to the preoperative IOP. That is, eyes with higher preoperative IOP have the greatest average lowering, whereas eyes with IOP in the lower range of statistically normal tend to have an IOP that is unchanged from before cataract surgery, or even higher following cataract surgery.

If you or someone you know has cataracts and either high eye pressure or glaucoma and is thinking about cataract surgery, please share this information and ask them to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group, Google+ or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Thursday, July 16, 2015

Welcome Cornea Specialist Adam Sise, M.D.!

Dr. Adam Sise
Cornea Specialist, Cataract & LASIK Surgeon
Join us in welcoming Cornea Specialist, Cataract & LASIK Surgeon Adam Sise, M.D. to Eyecare Medical Group. Dr. Sise sees patients for refractive surgery such as Bladeless LASIK, as well for the diagnosis and treatment of corneal disease including corneal transplants using both traditional cornea surgery and transplant techniques and advanced techniques such as DSAEK (Decemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty). Dr. Sise provides cataract surgery and lens implants including toric lens implants for astigmatism and multifocal lens implants to help patients eliminate reading glasses and bifocals after cataract surgery.

Dr. Sise received his medical degree from Temple University School of Medicine followed by a Residency in Ophthalmology at Washington Hospital Center and Georgetown University Hospital. In addition he completed a fellowship in Cornea and External Disease at the University of Miami-Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and certified by the American Board of Ophthalmology as well as a member of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS).

You may schedule an appointment with Dr. Sise by calling 207-773-0432.


Monday, July 6, 2015

Insurance and Billing Questions

At Eyecare Medical Group we like to do the best we can to make sure that you understand the bills that you receive from us, but we also know that this is a very confusing process. Patients who have medical services at any doctors office or facility know that there is an array of paper work that is received in the mail, sometimes just for one office visit- and all of it is confusing. That is why we have an insurance counselor that sits in the lobby of our practice that can help clear up confusion regarding bills and insurance explanation of benefits. Just bring your EOB or your bill to Jerrod, our insurance counselor, and he will be able to help you determine what your balance is, if any, and what you may have for a balance for upcoming procedures. Not coming into the office anytime soon? Call our Patient Accounts Department anytime Monday-Thursday 8-4:30 or Fridays between the hours of 8 and 2 pm at 207-791-8283 and one of our Patient Accounts Specialists will be able to assist you!


If you or someone you know wishes to schedule an appointment or needs help with additional information please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020 visit Eyecare Medical Group, Google+ or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Monday, June 22, 2015

Do High Dose Vitamins Increase Cataract Risk?


Most people are aware of the need to have a proper amount of vitamin intake in order to maintain their overall health. We also know that certain vitamins may play a role in helping to avoid certain age related eye problems such as age related macular degeneration (AMD). But are vitamins good or bad with regard to your risk of developing cataracts? As it turns out, certain vitamins taken in high doses may actually increase your risk of developing cataracts.

Researchers reporting in the American Journal of Epidemiology evaluated the risks and benefits of taking high dose supplements of vitamins C and E and low-dose multivitamins with the risk of developing age related cataract.  Their study looked at any associations of high-dose supplements of vitamins C and E and low dose multivitamins with the risk of age related cataract in a group of 31,120 men who ranged in age from 45–79 years of age. Their results suggest that the use of high dose-but not low dose-single vitamin C or E supplements may increase the risk of age-related cataract. The risk may be even higher among older men, corticosteroid users, and long-term users.

If you or someone you know takes high doses of vitamins or is concerned about their risk of cataracts please call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group, Google+ or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Monday, June 15, 2015

Osteoporosis a Risk for Cataracts?

What do calcium balance, osteoporosis and cataracts have to do with each other? Actually, maybe quite a bit according to researchers reporting in the journal Clinical Ophthalmology who identified interesting information regarding an association between cataracts, cataract surgery and osteoporosis.

About Calcium, Osteoporosis & Cataract Risk
Especially in seniors and aging populations, we know that calcium is an important factor in bone health and the development of osteoporosis. We also know that calcium is an important factor in cataract formation.  What wasn’t obvious or apparent until the researchers carefully analyzed the data was whether there was any association between osteoporosis and cataracts.

Osteoporosis Risk Factors Associated with Cataracts
The researchers first identified that that age, female sex, higher socioeconomic class, smoking, chronic renal failure, hyperthyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases are all associated with an increased prevalence of osteoporosis. Then through careful statistical modeling also found that these factors and osteoporosis are ALL associated with an increased prevalence of cataracts. Thus, they concluded that osteoporosis is associated with the presence of cataracts which may be related to calcium imbalance, hormonal abnormalities, and even a shared genetic predisposition.

If you or someone you know is concerned about osteoporosis and their risk of cataracts, please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group, Google+ or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Monday, June 8, 2015

Cataract Surgery Day with Dr. Cassidy

Dr. Cassidy will perform your cataract surgery right here at Eyecare Medical Group in our outpatient eye surgery center. Your cataract surgery with Dr. Cassidy will begin with a few sets of drops being placed in your eye to dilate your pupil. Your eye will then be treated with an anesthetic so that you will feel little if anything during your surgery.  Next, Dr. Cassidy will make a very small incision at the outermost edge of your cornea. This incision will be just large enough to allow a microscopic instrument the size of a pen tip to pass through it.

 Dr. Bruce Cassidy, M.D.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               
Dr. Cassidy will then gently pass a microscopic instrument through the tiny incision and create an opening in the capsule of the crystalline lens to allow access to the cloudy lens material

Next, Dr. Cassidy will gently pass another sophisticated high technology microscopic instrument through the tiny incision. Sound waves or “Ultrasound” produced at the tip of the instrument will be used to gently break the cataract into pieces small enough to be washed away, drawn through the instrument and removed from your eye. This cataract removal technique is called “phacoemulsification” and is preferred for most patients.

After the cataract has been removed, Dr. Cassidy will be able to insert a new, crystal clear permanent intraocular lens implant (IOL) into your eye. The replacement lens will actually be inserted and placed in the correct position through the same tiny incision at the outer edge of the cornea through which the surgeon removed the cataract. 

Upon completion of your cataract and lens implant surgery, Dr. Cassidy will have one of the surgery center staff members take you to a comfortable place where you will be able to rest and relax prior to going home. After resting for a short while, a surgery staff member will give you permission to have a family member or friend drive you home.

Dr. Cassidy will arrange to see you the next day after your cataract and lens implant surgery so he can examine you in order to confirm that you are healing and seeing as planned. He will also prescribe some eye drops for you to use and may ask you to wear a protective shield, mainly at night, to remind you not to accidentally rub your eye. Although each patient will heal a little bit differently, the majority of patients having cataract surgery at Eyecare Medical Group are able to see well enough to return to their routine daily activities within a day or so after their cataract surgery.


If you or someone you know has questions about cataracts, cataract surgery or lens implants please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020 visit Eyecare Medical Group, Google+ or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.


Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Stop Smoking & Decrease Cataract Risk


Smoking is a well known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, breathing and lung problems, all types of cancer as well as the eye problems of age related macular degeneration (AMD), retinal vascular disease, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. It has also been reported that smoking increases your risk of cataracts. But, there is some good news from researchers who studied the risk of cataracts among smokers and reported in JAMA Ophthalmology that stopping smoking decreases the risk of cataracts over time.

Research Says Stop Smoking to Decrease Cataract Risk
The researchers followed a total of 44,371 men, 45 to 79 years old over a 10 year period. The participants filled out questionnaires on their smoking habits and lifestyles and were then matched with the Swedish National Day-Surgery Register and local records of cataract extraction. The researchers found that smokers of more than 15 cigarettes a day had a 42% increased risk of cataract surgery compared with men who had never smoked. It also found that men who smoked an average of more than 15 cigarettes a day but had stopped smoking more than 20 years earlier had a 21% increased risk. Thus, they found a positive association between cigarette smoking and cataract surgery in men, with a significant increase of cataracts among smokers compared to those who never smoked. Also, stopping smoking was associated with a statistically significant decrease in risk with increasing time from stopping smoking. Even heavy smokers had some benefit from quitting smoking. Further, a previous study detailed the relationship between smoking cessation and cataract risk in women. In this study, they found  that after cessation of smoking, cataract risk in women decreased with time. Women who smoked 6 to 10 cigarettes a day but had ceased smoking 10 years earlier, and women who smoked more than 10 cigarettes a day but had ceased smoking 20 years earlier were found to have a relative risk of cataracts not significantly different from women who had never smoked.

Smoking cessation seems to decrease the risk of cataract development and the need for cataract surgery with time, although the risk persists for decades. The higher the intensity of smoking, the longer it takes for the increased risk to decline. These findings emphasize the importance of early smoking cessation and, preferably, the avoidance of smoking altogether.

If you or someone you know has been a smoker or is currently a smoker and is concerned about their risk of cataracts, there is good reason to stop smoking. If you have questions about cataract risk, cataract surgery or lens implants please feel free to call Eyecare Medical Group, 53 Sewall Street, Portland, Maine 04102 at 888-374-2020, visit Eyecare Medical Group, Google+ or facebook.com/eyecaremedicalgroup to schedule an appointment.